May 12 2010

Quilling Shapes

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Coils

 
tight-coilTight Coil:  Roll a strip of paper tightly around your tool (slotted tool, needle tool, or toothpick), being sure to deep the paper in alignment as you roll.  Place a small dab of glue at the end of the strip, glue end to the roll, and hold until set.  Remove the tool.
 
loose-coilLoose Coil:  Roll a strip into a tight coil; remove the tool and allow the roll uncoil to the desired size.  Glue the loose end to the coil.
 
teardropTeardrop:  Make a loose coil.  With your index finger and thumb, pinch the coil into a point, allowing the opposite side to remain round.
 
shaped-teardropShaped Teardrop:  Make a loose coil and pinch it into a teardrop, curving the pinched end slightly so that it flairs out.
 
marquiseMarquise:  Make a loose coil.  Holding the coil between the index finger and thumbs of both hands, pinch the coil into two points, leaving the center of the coil round and loose.
 
shaped-marquise-horizontalShaped Marquise:  Make a loose coil and pinch it into a marquise.  With your fingers or curling tool, curl the ends in the opposite direction.
 
elongated-marquise-horizontalElongated Marquise:  Make a VERY loose coil and pinch it into a long, narrow marquise.
 
pressed-heartPressed Heart:  Make a loose coil and pinch into a teardrop.  With your fingernail or a toothpick, indent the center of the round end to form a heart.
 
squareSquare:  Make a loose coil and pinch it into a marquise.  Rotate the marquise 90 degrees between your thumbs and index fingers and pinch again, forming two more points.  Each side should be the same length.
 
rectangle-coilRectangle:  Make a loose coil and pinch it into a marquise.  Rotate the marquise slightly between your thumbs and index fingers and pinch again, forming two more points near the original ones to form two long sides and two short sides.
 
triangleTriangle:  Make a loose coil and pinch it into a teardrop.  While holding the teardrop by the pinched end, press down on the rounded end and pinch two more points.  You can vary the height of the triangle by placing these two pinched points closer or further apart.
 
half-circleHalf Circle:  Make a loose coil and pinch it into a teardrop.  Pinch the paper a second time closer to the first point.  You can vary the height of the half circle by placing the two pinched points closer or further apart.
 
crescentCrescent:  Make a loose coil and pinch it into a half circle.  Press in the center of the half circle while curving the ends to form a crescent moon shape.
 
elongated-crescentElongated Crescent:  Make a VERY loose coil.  Press in the center while curving the ends to form an elongated crescent moon shape.
 

Scrolls

 
loose-scrollLoose Scroll:  Loosely roll a strip into a coil.  Remove the quilling tool and allow the roll to uncoil.  Do not glue.
 
s-scrollS-Scroll:  Loosely roll one end of a paper strip half-way down.  Flip and loosely roll the other end in the opposite direction forming an “S” shape.  Do not glue.
 
c-scrollC-Scroll:  Loosely roll each end of a paper strip to the center to form a “C” shape.  Do not glue.
 
v-scrollV-Scroll:  Fold your strip of paper in half.  Loosely roll each end outward to form a “V” shape.  Do not glue.
 
heart-scrollHeart Scroll:  Fold your strip of paper in half.  Loosely roll each end toward the center to form a heart shape.  Do not glue.
 
 

4 responses so far

4 Responses to “Quilling Shapes”

  1. Jackie Paulsonon 15 Dec 2010 at 6:08 am

    Hello, I am learning to quill. My sister was not interested in her kit. I am attempting to make my first ornament for her a Candy Cane. Love this site.

  2. Charlion 22 Jan 2011 at 11:06 pm

    Everyone should practice their basic shapes as these are the foundation of your quilling. Even after 50 years of quilling I keep my chart with various sizes of shaped quills on the wall of my craft room. The reason? So that when I’m designing I can refer to it to make sure my sizes/shapes will fit.

    I also keep a chart with each of the colors from the major manufactures of quilling strips. Did you know that different brands roll differently? I hope everyone has a great time quilling. This is a wonderful age in which to quill as there are so many free resources online and so many quillers you can talk with.

  3. Charlotteon 24 Jan 2011 at 10:39 pm

    Hi, Charli,

    Thank you so much for visiting my blog and adding your great tips so all can benefit from your experience.

    You have so much helpful information on your site. I have my own library of “vintage” quilling books (although, I do hate using that word when the books are from the late 60s-80s) and enjoyed comparing them to your list to see what I might be missing.

    I do agree that it is a wonderful age in which to quill. Back in the day, I was the only one I knew about, now we have our own guild!

    Take care,
    Charlotte

  4. Elaineon 21 Mar 2013 at 6:36 pm

    THANK YOU !!! this was very helpful. THIS WHOLE WEBSITE IS AWESOME!!!!

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