Oct 22 2010

Quilled Pumpkin Patch Characters

Published by at 8:35 pm under Halloween quilling,Quilling Pattern

In October of 2009, I posted an entry featuring Ms. Pumpkin Head, a small gourd pumpkin with quilled features just like the children’s toy, Mr. Potato Head.
 
Imagine my surprise and delight when Lynne Carr, a member of a quilling Yahoo! group I belong to, posted this photo of her wonderful pumpkin patch characters based on my design.  Of course, I had to ask her if she would share them with you and she graciously agreed.
 
lynnes_smiles_pumpkins 

Lynne’s Quilling Background

 
Lynne discovered quilling in the fall of 2006 when she picked up a child’s quilling kit for a friend’s daughter in her local Dollar Tree.  The friend decided she didn’t want it so it was set aside for six months.  Lynne was going to throw it out, but decided to go online to see what quilling was.  After she “picked [her] jaw up off the floor,” she decided to give it a try herself and it was instant love at first twirl.  
 
Her first quilling piece was a simple purple flower.  She tried the many designs she found online and soon discovered a 3D picture of several frogs sitting around a pond which won her heart.  With her Dollar Tree strips now gone, Lynne started to cut her own 1/8″ strips from construction paper and tried making a small pond scene with only 1 frog and cattail.  She says that the light weight construction paper quilled fine, but the paper wasn’t colorfast and her once colorful scene is now very pale as it has almost faded away.
 
She and her husband, Joe, are self-employed with very busy schedules.  It seems as soon as she sits down to quill, she is called away (sound familiar?).  Lynne loves that quilling is a versatile art you can start and stop quickly.  She now purchases her quilling strips online to save time and obtain the colors she needs that don’t fade. 
 
Lynne’s projects are a mixture of designs she has found online, her ever-growing collection of books, and her imagination.  She was kind enough to mention that she enjoyed my Quilling with Confidence eBook* and actually quilled the “beautiful cross” (a free quilling pattern found in the eBook) and has it hanging on a wall over her desk.
 

Lynne’s Smiles

 
She has a collection of simple designs that she calls her “smiles” — things like frogs, butterflies, angels, ducks, flowers, etc., that are usually ½ to 1 inch in size.  She keeps them with her and gives one to anyone she sees who she thinks needs a smile.  She says that the reaction has been amazing.  These little pieces of twirled paper have a way of making people of all ages smile who moments before were frustrated, upset, or sad.  Lynne’s philosophy about her “smiles” is wonderful:
 
“I tell people who want to give me money for them, smiles are meant to be free.  I gave them my smile and they gave me theirs in return, so we were even.  And those smiles have given both my husband and me memories no money could ever buy.”
 
How awesome is that???  What a wonderful way to spread quilling love with others.  Kudos, Lynne.  
 

Lynne’s Pumpkin Patch Characters

 
This past summer Lynne found my blog post on Ms. Pumpkin Head and waited until the gourds were available in the stores to give it a try.  She changed the lips to a simple half moon for a more comic look.  To dress the pumpkins she went online to look for patterns for a child’s costume hat and found one of a pirate.  She reduced the size of the pattern and glued it to a black band and lets it sit like a sweatband around the pumpkin.
 
For the witch’s hat, she drew two circles, 4-inches in diameter, on black construction paper, then cut one of the circles in half.  She rolled the half circle into a cone and glued it together, just barely overlapping the sides.  Next, she sat the cone in the center of the full circle and traced around it so she would know the diameter of the cone.  She then made another circle in the center about the size of a quarter.  She cut out the quarter size hole in the center, then cut from the hole to the middle circle (the one she drew when she traced around the cone) like she was fringing around it.  She folded the fringe up and glued the fringe inside the cone shape.  This gave her a witch’s hat that fit over the stem of the pumpkin and the stem helped keep it from falling off.  She offered this great tip:  When drawing on black construction paper use a pencil, it leaves a shinny mark that is easier to see. 
 
The only problem she ran into was using Elmer’s glue to adhere the features to the pumpkin because they pop off if they come in contact with anything.  She has given a dozen pumpkins away and explains to the recipient that if it happens, just pick up some Elmer’s and glue them back.  No one seems to mind this little drawback.  Everyone has loved the pumpkins, and are just amazed about how they look as they are shocked to find out it’s a real pumpkin. 
 

*You can receive your own copy of my free eBook, Quilling with Confidence, by filling in the form located in the top right of this blog.

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4 responses so far

4 Responses to “Quilled Pumpkin Patch Characters”

  1. annon 22 Oct 2010 at 9:17 pm

    those are so adorable. I just love them. I also like her idea of giving away smiles. I just may have to use that. Now I want to make some pumpkin characters. I think a trip to the local pumpkin farm is in order.

  2. Helenon 23 Oct 2010 at 11:55 pm

    I just loved Lynne’s story, and it has inspired me also to give away “smiles”. What a lovely way to pass more love around, as well as a love for quilling – such a simple little thing to do, yet so powerful and far reaching!! Thanks so much, Charlotte, for doing this interview with Lynne! One would have to go a long way to hear such a charming and touching story!!! hugs to both of you, Helen

  3. Philippaon 25 Oct 2010 at 10:36 am

    What an inspiring post – and I think the ‘smiles’ are a great idea!

  4. Lisaon 27 Oct 2010 at 7:40 pm

    Love Lynne’s all inspiring story.
    Her pumpkins are just too darn cute.

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