May 12 2010

The Art of Quilling News — May 2010

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Quilled Stencil Sailboat ATC

STENCIL CARD FRONT

STENCIL CARD FRONT

This ATC (Artist Trading Card) is built in three layers:  (1) the top layer which consists of a decorative background with a stencil cut into it which will be the stencil card; (2) the second layer which is the quilling that is glued to the back of the stencil card, and (3) the third layer which is a plain piece of card stock that  is glued to the back of the completed stencil card to protect the quilling and finish the ATC.

 
Materials List
  • 2.5″ x 3.5″ light blue card stock you have already decorated on one side to look like water and sky (see STENCIL CARD FRONT for decorating ideas).  This will be the stencil card.
  • STENCIL CARD BACK

    STENCIL CARD BACK

    2.5″ x 3.5″ card stock, white, for the ATC backing card

  • 1/16″ quilling paper:  brown, red, green, blue, white
  • 2.5″ square piece of stencil plastic or acetate
  • craft knife, cutting mat, tape, pencil
  • basic quilling tools (listed here)
 
Step 1 — Cut Stencil Card
Fig 1

Fig 1

Create the sailboat stencil template by following the instructions on the downloadable Pattern Guide.  Position the stencil template (flag pointing to the right) on the BACK of your decorated light blue piece of card stock.   Make sure that the boat hull is above the waterline of the waves that appear on the front of the card and sketch the sailboat outline onto the back of the card (Fig 1).  Cut out the sailboat pieces with a craft knife.  You have now completed the stencil card.

 
Note:  See the Quilling Shapes Chart (located in my blog’s Beginner’s Corner) for instructions on rolling the coils used in this project.  Refer to the above photo labeled STENCIL CARD BACK for the placement of your quilled coils. 
 
Step 2 — Mast (brown)
For the mast, form a 4-inch brown paper strip into a rectangle coil.  Repeat for a total of five rectangles.  Dry fit pieces to the back of the stencil card making sure the mast opening is covered.  Quill additional piece if needed to cover the mast opening completely.  Glue rectangles together, end to end to form the mast.  Apply glue to the stencil card edges surrounding the mast opening and affix the quilled mast.
 
Step 3 — Flag (red)
For the flag, form a 6-inch red paper strip into a triangle coil.  Dry fit the triangle to make sure it covers the flag opening and glue in place.
 
Step 4 — Boat Hull (green)
For the hull, form a 6-inch green paper strip into a rectangle coil.  Repeat for a total of three rectangles.  Form a 6-inch green paper strip into a triangle.  Repeat for a total of two triangles.  Dry fit pieces to the back of the stencil card in the following order:  triangle-rectangle-rectangle-rectangle-triangle.  Quill additional piece if needed to cover the boat hull opening completely.  Glue the quilled shapes together, end to end, to form the boat hull.  Apply glue to the stencil card edges surrounding the hull opening and affix the quilled pieces.
 
Step 5 — Triangle Sail (blue)
Fig 2

Fig 2

For the triangle sail, form a 6-inch blue paper strip into an elongated marquise coil.  Repeat for a total of eight elongated marquises.  Using the printed sailboat pattern (from the Pattern Guide) and your work board, fit the marquise shapes over the triangle sail.  Carefully glue the edges of the marquises where they touch and pinch the seams together with the tweezers.  Pin in place as you go (Fig 2).  Quill additional shapes as needed to cover entire area.  Unpin the sail section and dry fit it to the back of the stencil card.  Apply glue to the stencil card edges surrounding the triangle sail opening and affix the quilled sail.

 
Step 6 — Billowing Sail (white)
Fig 3

Fig 3

For the billowing sail, form an 11-inch white paper strip into an elongated crescent coil.  Repeat for a total of eight elongated crescents.  Fit the crescent shapes over the billowing sail area of the printed sailboat pattern on your work board.  Carefully glue the edges of the crescents where they touch and pinch the seams together with the tweezers.  Pin in place as you go (Fig 3).  Quill additional shapes as needed to cover entire area.  Unpin the sail section and dry fit it to the back of the stencil card.  Apply glue to the stencil card edges surrounding the billowing sail opening and affix the quilled sail.

 
Step 7 — Finish Card
Turn the card over and look at it from the front.  Check to see that all cut stencil openings are filled in with the quilling.  Once you are satisfied with the look of your stencil card, turn it over again and apply a narrow line of glue around all four edges of the back of the stencil card.  Glue the piece of plain white card stock to the back of the stencil card, being sure to line up the edges.  This finishes the ATC off with a nice back cover.
 

Words of Inspiration

One of the things that I love most about artists and crafters, is our willingness to share what we know with others.   It’s through this sharing of ideas that new ones are born.

 

“Passion is the very fuel of inspiration. Artists, of all people, must be willing to share their passions with the world.”

 ~Carole Katchen

 

Happy Blogiversary to Me!

Can you believe it?  My blog is now one year old!  It has been an amazing year of creative growth for me and I want to thank each of you for being a part of this journey.

Please take a moment to let me know what I’ve done right (or wrong) this past year and what you would like to see in the coming year — background techniques, outside the box ideas, recycle/upcycle projects, cards, gifts, tips for selling your quilling, etc.?  You may use the comment box below.  Thanks!

  
*Be sure to save the Pattern Guide to your hard drive for future reference. 
 
 

13 responses so far

13 Responses to “The Art of Quilling News — May 2010”

  1. Sharonon 12 May 2010 at 10:52 pm

    Congratulations on your one-year anniversary.Thanks for a great blog … I’ve really enjoyed all your posts and all the information you share with us.

  2. annon 12 May 2010 at 10:59 pm

    congratulations on your blogoversary. I’m rather new to your blog so I can’t give any type of critique but from what I’ve seen so far I like it 🙂 Not to mention that I’m not expert in the field of blogging myself.
    As for what I would like to see in the coming year, I’m rather partial to recycle/upcycle types of projects. I wouldn’t mind seeing that type of thing. Anything creative though is of interest to me.

  3. mayrasssson 12 May 2010 at 11:10 pm

    OMG!!! so beautiful !!

    friend congratulations for your first year

    mayrassss
    http://mayracrafts.blogspot.com/

  4. Jenniferon 12 May 2010 at 11:47 pm

    Congratulations on your one-year anniversary. I’ve enjoyed reading your blog and your e-newsletter. I cant think of anything to change. Thank you for the inspiration.

  5. Sharon Fieldon 12 May 2010 at 11:51 pm

    Congrats on your anniversary……….keep up the great work!

  6. helenon 13 May 2010 at 12:17 am

    Congratulations on your blog anniversary. I enjoyed your creations. Anything you wanted to share is greatly appreciated.

  7. Nonaon 13 May 2010 at 2:41 am

    I agree with Helen – you are very talented and most generous with your designs. Always enjoy your site.

  8. Lisaon 13 May 2010 at 3:14 am

    Congrats on your blogoversary!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I think your site is a great learning tools.
    You give great tuts and love the patterns you share and the ideas you offer. THANK YOU!
    You ROCK!

    🙂

  9. Gail Freedon 13 May 2010 at 5:06 am

    Congrats! Your blog is great and I wouldn’t suggest changing anything.

  10. Cathyon 13 May 2010 at 7:25 am

    Congrats on your blogiversary…. happy celebrating. Love the atc… thanks for sharing the how-to.

  11. Kathon 13 May 2010 at 9:52 am

    Love the different ways you’ve dealt with the sail designs, very inventive! Also putting the stencil over the top is unusual too – takes some fiddling about, but well worth the effort.
    Haven’t been receiving your newsletter for long but am very impressed with your ideas, I pass them on to the activities
    co-ordinator in the nursing home where I work. She makes up various shapes and gives them to residents to use as card toppers. (In fact, you and I introduced her to quilling a few weeks ago! Now she’s discovered a new hobby as well as finding a cheap resource of versatile, pretty card toppers!)

  12. Lynne Carron 13 May 2010 at 10:25 am

    Thank you again for sharing your talent and knowledge with us. I look forward to hearing from you. The cross from Quilling with Confidence is hanging above my workdesk. Thank you again
    Lynne

  13. Parinazon 15 May 2010 at 4:31 pm

    Happy Blog Anniversary & a big thank you for sharing your creative ideas with us!

    Would love to see more ideas & tips for selling quill work..

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