Archive for the 'Christmas Quilling' Category

Nov 21 2012

Quilled Chalkboard Ornament for Teacher

I was looking around the craft store yesterday and came across some small chalkboard ornaments in the unfinished wood section (Craftwood brand made by Darice).

chalkboard ornament with quilling embellishments

At 2-in x 3-in, these little chalkboards are the perfect size for a gift tag ornament and come complete with a hang cord attached.  They are so inexpensive that you could make one for the teacher, room mother, and even the principal, without breaking the bank.

 

The chalkboard is recessed exactly 1/8-in so the quilling embellishments fit right in.  I added an apple and pencil to mine, but there are many cute school embellishments you could add like a school bus, school bell, or old fashioned school house.

 

I was afraid that actual chalk would wipe off, so I used a white paint pen (Painters paint marker by Elmers) to paint on the numbers and letters. 

chalkboard ornament supplies
The back of the chalkboard is nice and smooth making it easy to write the “to” and “from” information — and don’t forget to add the date.

 

Wouldn’t this be a great craft project to make with the kids?

 

 

5 responses so far

Nov 27 2011

Packaging Quilling Ornaments for Sale or Gifts

I have participated in many craft shows over the years and have found one that I really like sponsored by the South Cobb Arts Alliance.  Unlike traditional 1-2 day shows where you set up your booth and then personally sell your merchandise each day, this 11-day show is set up like a Christmas house.  You bring your items for the initial set up, work two 3-hour shifts, pick up your unsold items, and they mail you a check for the items that you did sell.  It is wonderful!

 

The only down side is that you are not there to watch over your items.  That is where creative packaging can be a big help.  Along with my “captured ornament” series, this year I am offering three different quilled ornaments for sale.  And while I know that paper ornaments are quite sturdy, I really didn’t want to put them out without some type of protection.  I would hope that adults would treat them with proper care, but the tables are low enough that little ones might be tempted to reach for them.

 

To solve this problem, I created a simple gift box for each ornament and then placed it inside a plastic sleeve (like those used for cards).  Packaged with the box open, potential buyers can see exactly what the ornament looks like.   

 

I make the gift boxes from heavy scrapbook paper or card stock.  I like using a nice printed paper for the top and a solid color for the bottom.  I purchase the paper during the year when I find it on sale, that way the boxes cost next to nothing.  My boxes are roughly 3-in x 3-in square, but you will want to make yours sized to fit your ornaments.  Just be sure to make the lid a little bit larger so it will fit over the bottom (trust me — I speak from frustrated experience).  I also make the lid height a little bit shorter than the bottom height so that the box is easier for the recipient to open.  There are several good scoring tools on the market (I use the Martha Stewart one, but Score-Pal is very popular, too) that make creating these boxes a snap.  For those who would like detailed instructions for making these boxes, I have posted a step-by-step tutorial.

 

For an added touch, I cut a piece of white quilt batting to fit inside the box.  I purchased an inexpensive roll of batting at my local JoAnn store (using a coupon, of course!).  I’ve probably made five dozen boxes and still have plenty of batting left for next year.  This gives the gift box the feel of an expensive jewelry gift box.  I did find, however, that my white snowflake did not show up well on the white batting, so I cut a piece of pale silver tissue to sit on top of the batting underneath the snowflake. 

 

Since my ornaments are for sale, I include my custom hang tag which contains basic quilling information.  This tucks away neatly underneath the batting.

 

Even if you don’t participate in craft shows, you might want to give this idea a try.  Think of how delighted your friends and family will be to receive your quilled ornaments inside their own little gift box.

 

3 responses so far

Nov 06 2011

Add Quilling to Your Stamped Christmas Cards

When making cards, I think it is fun to replace letters with bits of quilling.  It adds such a touch of whimsy.  When I ran across the “Big On Christmas” stamps from Stampin’ Up! I knew they would be perfect for my 2011 Christmas cards.  As you can see, they had the same idea.  Of course, I didn’t want to stamp the tree, ornament, or snowman (which I replaced with a snowflake).  I wanted to quill those instead.

 

Unfortunately, having this idea and implementing it proved to be two very different things.  You see, I am not a talented stamper and I was having a hard time stamping just the letter part of these holiday stamps.  I tried adding ink to just the letters using a marking pen, but my hand would slip and I would invariably get ink on the picture portion of the stamp.  Next, I tried covering the picture parts with tape, but that didn’t work for me either.

 

Finally, I decided to cut out the part of the stamps I didn’t want printed.  It was a hard decision to make since there was a very good chance I could ruin the stamps, but I took my craft knife, held my breath, and carefully cut around the picture section of each stamp and peeled off the cut portions.  Since the stamps were mounted on wooden blocks, the spacing and alignment of the rest of the stamp sections was not disturbed.

 

I then inked them up (I like using StazOn solvent ink since it dries quickly and doesn’t smear) and stamped away.  As an added bonus, I was delighted to find that I hadn’t ruined my stamps at all.  The cut out portions fit right back into their original places so the stamps can still be used as they were originally intended.



I am sure that if you look around you’ll find many other stamps out there that would lend themselves to this creative “altered art” technique.

9 responses so far

Aug 30 2011

Quilled Captured Wreath Ornament

quilled wreath ornamentIn response to the many requests I’ve received for more “captured” ornaments, I am so very pleased to announce the newest addition to the collection:  a quilled wreath!

 

Just like the snowflake, this quilled wreath is assembled inside a glass ornament, safely preserved for years to come.  The wreath’s shape fills the ornament nicely and the red gems added to the tops of the berries add a nice touch of holiday sparkle as they catch the light.  Since the glass ornament is clear, the wreath is designed to be two-sided so it can be enjoyed from all angles.

 

For those of you who would like to create your own, I have written a full color digital pattern complete with photos to guide you every step of the way.  You’ll find this pattern, along with the Quilled Captured Snowflake, in my new Quilling Pattern Store.

 

The holidays will be here before you know it.  It’s never too early to create one of these stunning ornaments for your family and treasured friends.

10 responses so far

Aug 12 2010

Fall 2010 Quilling Classes at Marietta Community School

I will once again be teaching quilling classes this fall through the Marietta Community School, the continuing education division of Marietta City Schools.  The classes will be taught at Marietta High School, Marietta, GA.
 
  • Quilling I — Beginner/Fall (Thursday, Sept 23, 6:00-8:30pm)
  • Quilling I — Beginner/Halloween (Tuesday, Oct 5, 6:00-8:30pm)
  • Quilling I — Beginner/Christmas (Tuesday, Oct 12, 6:00-8:30pm)
  • Quilling II — Christmas Cards (Thursday, Nov 4, 6:00-8:30pm, Prerequisite:  Any Quilling I Class)
 
In each Quilling I class I’ll talk briefly about the history of quilling and show samples of the various quilling papers, tools, and books available.  Next, I’ll teach the students how to make the basic coils and scrolls used most in quilling as they complete a shape chart to take home for reference.  We’ll make one project in class and the students will go home with a pack of multi-colored quilling paper, a slotted quilling tool, plenty of informational handouts, and enough materials to complete two more projects so they can keep quilling after the class.  Check out the class projects for the Halloween and Christmas classes. 
 
The Quilling II — Christmas Cards class is for students who already know the basic coils and scrolls, but want more practice.  We’ll work on three quilled Christmas cards (original designs different than those provided in the Quilling I — Beginner/Christmas class).
 
You can check out the MCS online course catalog for complete registration information.  If you live in the area, I would like to personally invite you to join me for a wonderful evening of quilling. 
 
Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or need further information.  You may leave a comment on this post, or send an email to charlotte (at) theartofquilling (dot) com.

2 responses so far

Dec 09 2009

Heavenly Angel — Free Quilling Pattern

angelThere is still time to embellish your Christmas crafts with quilling.  This sweet little angle works up quickly and would add a heavenly touch to your Christmas projects.
 
You will need
Basic quilling tools (discussed earlier)
Quilling paper, 1/8″: white, yellow, gold metallic (solid gold on one side of the paper strip)
Gold leaf pen (optional) 
 
Free Quilling Pattern — Heavenly Angel
(1) 20″ teardrop, white (body)
(1) 10″ loose coil, white (head)
(2) 10″ shaped teardrops, light yellow (wings)
(1) 2″ strip, metallic gold (halo)
 
Instructions for making the teardrop and loose coil can be found here
 
Using the photo as a guide, glue the 10″ loose coil (head) to the pinched tip of the 20″ teardrop (body) to form the angel.  Shape the wings by curving the teardrop around your index finger as you pinch it, or roll the tip of the completed teardrop around your quilling tool.  If desired, run the gold pen across the top of the two 10″ shaped teardrop wings to gilt the edges before gluing them to the angel body.
 
haloTo make the halo, fold the 2″ strip of metallic gold paper in half and glue the two sides together.  You now have a 1″ strip with gold on both sides.  Overlap the two ends and glue together to form an oval loop.  Glue the halo flat (with the glued ends down) onto the background, slightly at an angle above the angel’s head.
 
christmas-card-angelLast year, I used this little angel on Christmas cards.  I used the same blue scrapbook paper that reminds me of a winter’s night that I used on the snowflake cards in the previous post and added a homespun feel with the golden gingham held in place with mini brads.
 
This year, I designed a scroll ornament from the sheet music of a familiar Christmas carol, “Angels We have Heard on High.” 
 
If you want to try making your own scroll ornament, there are many carols and hymns in the public domain. 
angel-scroll-ornament3Try a Google search for images or you can visit openhymnal.org to see if they have any you would like.  There are also many scrapbook papers and stamps with music backgrounds that would work nicely. 
 
 
Quilling Tip:  The metallic coating on the paper used to make the halo causes the glue to take longer to set.  I find it helpful to use a pair of tweezers to hold the ends of the halo strip together until the glue dries. 

7 responses so far

Nov 16 2009

Snowflake Ornament Quilling Card

christmas-quilling-class-snowflake-cardsI want to thank all of the ladies who attended the Christmas quilling class at the Marietta Community School.  I hope you had a great time because I know I sure did!
 
Our class project was a Christmas card with a detachable snowflake ornament.  I am very proud of the snowflakes the students quilled.  This group photo of the students’ cards shows their talent and creativity.  The snowflakes are not glued to the front (which is why they may appear to be crooked), but swing loose which makes for a fun surprise when the recipient opens the card.
 
snowflake-card-holeWhen creating the card, I punched a 1/16″ hole in the card at the top of the circle background.  This allowed me to thread the snowflake’s hanging loop through to the inside where I secured it with a piece of tape.
 
snowflake-card-inside1Many of us are on a tight budget, but you don’t have to trim your gift giving list this year.  These cards are perfect when you need a little something this holiday season for co-workers, as a hostess gift, or for members of your book club.  You can whip up a batch quite inexpensively, but I guarantee they’ll be appreciated and make a lasting impression.    
 
Quilling Tip:  I used a printed paper that reminded me of a starry night as the background for my snowflake, but many combinations are possible.  A quilled wreath would be great attached to a card featuring a home’s front door.  A quilled snowman could grace a card showing children playing in the snow.  Or quill a stocking and attach it to a card that shows a fireplace with a roaring fire.
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