Jan 30 2010

Beginner’s Quilling Corner

Published by

Basic Instructions/Tutorials

  • Quilling Shape Chart:  a convenient listing of the coils and scrolls used in my projects, complete with instructions and samples, all on one page.

Helpful Posts from the Archives

The following are  links to past posts written with the beginning quiller in mind.

10 responses so far

10 Responses to “Beginner’s Quilling Corner”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Kristine Debus. Kristine Debus said: Here's a great way to let someone know you care! Quill them a card! http://theartofquilling.com/beginners-corner [...]

  2. Heatheron 08 Jun 2011 at 5:56 pm

    I just discovered what quilling was a few days ago and now I am obsessed!! This website has such great ideas and wonderful instrucitons. Thank you so much for sharing!!

  3. Kimberleyon 31 Aug 2011 at 11:29 pm

    I’m so glad I found this site! I’ve wanted to learn Quilling, and none of the art craft supply stores in my area carry materials or instruction books. I’m hoping to learn enough to make Christmas gifts for my family.

    Thank you for being here, and I can hardly wait to read my new book.

  4. Jennifer La velleon 20 Nov 2011 at 9:15 pm

    Hi,

    I am new to quilling and I have a question. If I was making something that wasn’t going to be glued to some type of background, like a Christmas Ornaments, how do you keep the centers of your shapes from accidentally popping out. I have made the beginning of a simple snowflake, and when I picked it up, the middle of one of the coils popped out. I was able to push it back, but I wondered if there was a way to stop this from happening.

    Thanks!

    Jen

  5. Charlotteon 21 Nov 2011 at 1:46 am

    Hi, Jen,

    Not knowing what pattern you are using (or if you are designing your own), here are some general tips that I hope will help:

    1. Use smaller coils to form your design since the centers of larger coils tend to fall out more easily (i.e. use 3″ strips to make coils instead of 8″ strips).

    2. Use a sturdier paper when making your coils. You’ll see the difference in paper weights the more you quill. I like the papers from Quilled Creations for making ornaments.

    3. Use a longer strip of paper to make your coils, but don’t let it open up all the way. This will form a coil that is more dense than normal and a bit sturdier.

    4. If your design does call for a larger coil, quill an eccentric version of the coil. Since the coil edges are glued together, there is no center to pop out.

    I hope this info helps.

  6. Leanneon 27 Oct 2012 at 9:18 am

    Hi! I just started quilling yesterday and I’m having a small issue. My loose coils are too tight! I’m rolling as loosely as I can, but it still doesn’t “grow” all that much. What can I do to loosen up my coils after the fact?

  7. Charlotteon 27 Oct 2012 at 7:26 pm

    Hi, Leanne,

    I find that if I hold the coil in the palm of my hand and gently “huff” on it, the warm moisture of my breath helps the coil loosen.

  8. Deidraon 10 Dec 2012 at 1:15 am

    I was looking through many sites to find a “new craft” and found quilling. I love the idea so went on Amazon and got all the tools that I would need. I also bought a book The Art of Paper Quilling. Now after going through the book not so sure on the directions. I assumed after buying the paper that I use the whole thing for 1 shape. Is it possible that when it says eighteen 1/4 length marquises that I use the whole paper and keep it to 1/4?…it’s not specifying if I need to cut this paper to a certain size like I’ve seen on a few of the videos that I’ve watched. I need Quilling for Dummies! If anyone could help that would be great.

  9. Charlotteon 11 Dec 2012 at 1:24 pm

    Hello, Deidra,

    I am delighted that you have discovered quilling! It is a very versatile and fun art.

    I checked the copy of the book that I have and discovered that the paper lengths are explained in a note on page 33. Claire Choi is apparently using European papers because they are 10-5/8″ long. The paper strips from American companies run from 24″ to 17″ in length. Based on the 10-5/8″ start length, 1/2 strip is 5-3/8″ long, a 1/4″ strip is 2-11/16″ long, and a 1/8″ strip is 1-5/16″ long. You will want to tear your paper and not cut it. That way the ends blend in better when you glue your coils.

    I hope this information helps.

    Happy Quilling!

  10. marybeth h.on 10 Nov 2013 at 1:09 am

    I can’t wait to see the book! THANKS!! I always enjoy this activity and find it calming….but…NO One I know likes it! So….YOU are my new go-to person! Thanks, again! Sincerely, Mbeth H.

Trackback URI | Comments RSS

Leave a Reply